Where Are They Now: Rachel Davis ’13

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Please give a brief background on yourself and your career.
I grew up in New Hampshire, raised by divorcees. My mom, a middle school teacher, kept the house running for me and my little brother as a single mother – something I still marvel at. I took an intro philosophy class in my second semester and I was hooked from day one. By my senior year, I had to petition the college to let me take more philosophy classes as I’d hit the limit of classes you could take in one subject. I was always fascinated by the intersection of feminism, philosophy, and tech.

I currently work at Square, a payments company, working on their Risk team – helping merchants deal with payment disputes, fighting chargebacks, and identifying fraudsters. When I’m not working directly with merchants, I’m managing the production of Risk content for the Square Support Center and for email support.

How has your career changed since you originally envisioned it at Wellesley? What other careers did you consider as a student?
At Wellesley, I thought I was going to go into the nonprofit space; I did three internships in nonprofit and government work. I thought that was the only way you could do good for the world. I’ve since discovered that if you’re very careful, and you pick a company with amazing vision and values, you can leave an immensely positive mark on the world and work in the for-profit sector.

How has Wellesley contributed to your career?
Wellesley brought me to Northern California for the first time, via a Global Engagement internship. That’s when I fell in love with this part of the country. My major in philosophy has been a great asset – I’m a strong communicator and able to execute with limited, ambiguous or abstract knowledge as a result of my education. I’m currently the Secretary of the Wellesley Club of Northern California and I continue to thrive here with the support of the Wellesley community.

What is a typical work day or work week like for you?
In a typical day at Square, I’ll spend a few hours on the phone with Square merchants who are experiencing payment disputes – helping to explain the process and collect evidence to effectively fight the chargeback. I also spend a lot of time actually putting evidence together and responding to payment disputes on behalf of our merchants. The rest of my day usually goes to more capacity-building projects – e.g., producing content, fine-tuning our system for tracking email support inquiries, or implementing customer satisfaction surveys.

What piece of advice would you offer students looking to get into your area of interest and expertise?
Get comfortable with quantitative thinking. It’s not as hard as it seems in college – when you’re doing it in a highly practical/applied environment, it’s MUCH easier to learn. I didn’t take a single math class at Wellesley and I’ve managed to teach myself a fair bit of stats on the job. Also, spend serious time figuring out which values and beliefs are important to you. Rely on them, stick to them through college and your career. You won’t regret it.

What do you wish you had known as a student?
That everything post-graduation was going to be okay. Seriously. I was so stressed out through college trying to set myself up for success after graduating, and in the end, it’s my random intellectual interest in philosophy of language and technology that has opened up doors and made connections for me. Do well in school to cover your bases, but do whatever you can to find and follow your passions/interests – and don’t stress so much.

If you could come back and take one class at Wellesley what would it be?
Statistics! I’m okay at it now, but I’d love to have a really strong foundation.

Where Are They Now: Haley Beth Organ ’07

HaleyBeth_OrganPlease give a brief background on yourself and your career:
Born and raised in the suburbs of Kansas City, I am a huge barbecue and baseball fan. I find it noteworthy to mention this because it’s the only thing about me that has stayed true over the years.

I entered Wellesley in the fall of 2003 as a biology major on the pre-med track. It took almost 2 full years of undergraduate study for me to finally accept the fact that chemistry and calculus were not my friends. At that point, I switched to a major in psychology. After graduating from Wellesley in 2007, I returned home to develop an anti-poverty initiative called Young Achievers at the YMCA of Greater Kansas City as an AmeriCorps VISTA member. My experiences at the YMCA included grant writing, curriculum development, and marketing, solidifying my interest in non-profit management and working with people.

After a year at the YMCA, I moved to St. Louis, Missouri to attend graduate school at Washington University in St. Louis, where I received my Master of Social Work in 2010. My concentration in graduate school was macro-level social work, with an emphasis in program evaluation. Since then, I have worked as a program evaluator at the largest hospital system in the state of Missouri, evaluating the effectiveness of school-based health education programs.

The more I’ve learned and practiced the concepts of program evaluation, the more I’ve become interested in the idea of data visualization, or visually organizing data in a way that quickly and easily shows patterns, trends, and correlations. My interest in making data accessible and easy to understand for the everyday consumer led me back to school in 2014, where I earned a certificate in digital media and graphic design.

These days I am still evaluating the effectiveness of school-based health education programs, but have also started my own freelance graphic design business specializing in creating infographics and other data visualizations.

How has your career changed since you originally envisioned it at Wellesley?
I have to laugh when I think back to my days at Wellesley and what I thought my career would look like. I came in to Wellesley thinking I would follow in the footsteps of the late great Steve Irwin, Crocodile Hunter. I was interested in animal conservation and wanted to dedicate my life to being a zookeeper. After a few biology and anthropology courses at Wellesley, I became interested in pathology and forensics and thought I would become a Crime Scene Investigator like on TV. And then finally, after a few psychology courses at Wellesley, I decided I liked the idea of applied psychology and wanted to become a social worker. And, as they say, the rest was history.

How has Wellesley contributed to your career?
The biggest way that Wellesley has contributed to my career is that it taught me to be intellectually curious, to take risks, to believe in myself, and to create the opportunities I want.

What is a typical work day or week like for you?
What I like about my job is that it is really hard to say what a typical day or week looks like. If it’s during the school year, I tend to work on more data cleaning and analysis projects. Summer has more downtime, so I tend to work on more curriculum-related and website projects. Sprinkled in between all of that, I teach at a university once a week, participate in a number of coalitions and professional organizations that each have their own meetings and conferences, and I take as many professional development classes, workshops, and seminars as possible.

What piece of advice would you offer students looking to get into your area of interest and expertise?
As cliché as it sounds, sometimes it really is about who you know, not what you know. Network with as many people as you can. Be willing to take risks, but also learn to say no. Never stop learning, creating, or trying your hand at something new.

What do you wish you had known as a student?
I wish I had known that it’s okay not to know what you want to do with your life. I also wish I had known that it’s okay to change your mind. I’m almost 10 years out of Wellesley and some days I still don’t know what I want to do with my life. But that’s really okay. Just be sure to enjoy the journey.

If you could come back and take one class at Wellesley what would it be?
If I could do it all over again, I would retake a class called Downtown New York City’s Music Scene.  It was an upper-level course in the Music department where I got to listen to the Ramones and the Velvet Underground and call it homework. My final paper for the course was on the godmother of punk, Patti Smith. I wish I had realized back then just how cool this class really was.

Where Are They Now: Grace Leeson ‘14

Please give a brief background on yourself and your career.
I’m originally from Cumming, Georgia and majored in History at Wellesley. After graduating in May, I moved to New York to study and perform comedy. With a little luck and a Wellesley friend’s recommendation, I interned at Don’t Think Productions (DTP), the digital branch of the Upright Citizens Brigade (UCB) Theater. This internship opened the door to oodles of talented, incredible people that invited me to help on their film sets and eventually offered paid work. As DTP obtained more clients for branded content productions, I’ve had the opportunity to work as a production coordinator for funny web videos for companies like Lenovo and Above Average. Last fall, I joined UCB’s all-women’s sketch team, LASH. These days, I divide my time between serving as Producer on branded comedy shoots, and performing improv and sketch comedy around the city.

How has your career changed since you originally envisioned it at Wellesley? What other careers did you consider as a student?
When I came to Wellesley, I was another excited first-year considering a career in International Relations or growing up to be the next Professor Catherine Wearing. Honestly, I spent four years with absolutely no idea what kind of career I should pursue. Generally, I wanted a career where I felt smart, so graduate school or grassroots activism work dominated most of my research projects and internships.

How has Wellesley contributed to your career?
Dead Serious, the best (and only) improv troupe on campus was simultaneously the silliest and most instructive activity I did at Wellesley. I spent two hours a week rolling on the ground with laughter and learned to execute three day comedy festivals. These friends gave me my first production jobs, housed me without blinking, and are the best mentors and pals around. We continue to collaborate on shows and shoots to this day. I would not be a producer at UCB had I not joined Dead Serious.

Wellesley surrounded me with brilliant people that love to work hard, so I knew what kind of people I wanted to work with once I left campus. My favorite workplace skill from Wellesley was learning to listen more so that I could more accurately advocate for others and myself.

What is a typical work day or work week like for you?
Production is largely project based. As a short form branded content producer, my workdays vary during pre-production, production, and post-production days. I spend most of my time coordinating the creative teams, scouting locations, and booking talent. Shoot days are the most fun, because I can watch directors and cinematographers, essentially receiving free film classes. DTP is a tiny but mighty production company, so I do a little bit of everything to make sure we operate the best we can.

What piece of advice would you offer students looking to get into your area of interest and expertise?
Move to the city where you have at least one friend with similar tastes and interests. If they have different talents than you do, then all the better! Whether you want to write, direct, produce, act, shoot, or edit, having that friend can be the jolt of energy that you need to keep being an artist.

Say yes to every production job you are offered. At first, it’s the only way to meet people and to learn the lay of the land.

Prepare to not have money. Trust yourself that you’ll get by, because you’re intelligent and hardworking and production sets usually have free food.

What do you wish you had known as a student?
I wish I had known what internships were really supposed to teach you. Internships are for learning what kind of project structure, work environment, and people keep you looking forward to going to work every day. I wasted so much time not applying to internships because I thought that the internship was geared toward a specific career that I wasn’t sure I would like.

I also wish I had known much earlier that I should apply to graduate school once I have a goal that requires graduate school as a prerequisite. Very few people know exactly what makes them happy at 22 years old. Graduate school was an idea that I entertained instead of admitting to myself that I truly loved comedy and performance. Honestly, coming out as a lesbian and as a comedian were equally difficult and ended the same way. I found a community to relate to, and I stopped lying to my parents about what I was doing on Saturday nights.

If you could come back and take one class at Wellesley what would it be?
I had a running list of classes that I wanted to take before I graduated starting sophomore year on my old computer. Anything with Cudjoe or Jeffries. And I’m truly bummed that I never took Astro 101.

What’s happening with the CWS — week of 4/13

this week @ cws

Below are this week’s upcoming events and deadlines at the CWS. These listings and more can be found in MyCWS. Make sure you subscribe so that you receive the updates directly to your inbox!

Monday, April 13-

  • PEEK into life at Harvard Business School |5:00-6:30PM | Wellesley College Club, Counsel Dining Room - Would you like to PEEK into life
    at Harvard Business School? Come to an information session led by Dee Leopold, Managing Director of MBA Admissions at Harvard Business School.
  • Interviewing & Networking for Athletes | 7:30-8:30PM | PNE 239 - SAAC and the CWS are teaming up to bring an Interviewing and Networking Workshop to the Athlete Community. Come learn some interview tips and networking tricks!

Wednesday, April 15 -

  • UK Fellowships Info Session |4:30-5:30PM | GRH 442 (CWS library) - This info session will review fellowships that fund graduate study in the UK. We’ll review the Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell, Churchill, Fulbright, Gates-Cambridge and Saint Andrews Society Scholarships, including application components, the campus nomination process, and the fellowship experience. RSVP on MyCWS.

Thursday, April 16 -

  • You Have a Job With Benefits or an Internship With Out…Now What? | 12:30-1:30PM | Lulu Wang Center, Room 413 - Learn important tips on how to best prepare before leaving Wellesley and how to utilize your new benefits package or alternative health options to stay healthy. Presented by: Sarah Cooper Munger RD, and Nancy Baden, RN, Community Outreach Nurse.
  • MBTI Workshop | 4:40-6:00PM | GRH 428 - Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator can help you understand who you are and how you make career choices. Are you a reflective person who makes decisions based on your values? Are you a conceptual thinker who likes to plan your day? Or, are you a pragmatist who goes with the flow?  How does knowing this help you choose a potential career? Registered participants will be notified when the online MBTI assessment is available to take through MyCWS.
  • 2015 Day To Make A Difference Site Leader Info Session | 5:00-6:00PM | PNE 239 - Continue Wellesley’s rich tradition of service and citizenship by being a Site Leader for the College’s sixteenth annual Day to Make A Difference in Fall 2015. Each year, this day of service gives students, alumnae, faculty, and staff a chance to volunteer in their communities. As a Site Leader, you have the opportunity to lead a group of volunteers and oversee a service site. If you are interested in learning more about the Site Leader positions, we encourage you to attend an information session. Please register for this event through MyCWS.

Friday, April 17 -

  • Planning for Law School | 4:30PM | PNE 239 - Come for a candid presentation on preparing for law school, thinking carefully about whether or not to attend, strategizing where to apply, anticipating life as a law student and the work life of a lawyer. Q&A will be integrated into the presentation and addressed at the close of the program. RSVP on MyCWS.

 

featured jobs of the week

All jobs and internships can be viewed via MyCWS; use MyCWS Job ID numbers to search.

  • Philanthropy Intern, Brookline, MA (MyCWS ID 15564)
  • Marketing Internship, Wayland, MA (MyCWS ID 15566)
  • Business Development Intern, Wellesley, MA (MyCWS ID 15570)
  • Engineering and Computing Internship – Publishing, Waltham, MA (MyCWS ID 15547)
  • Life Sciences Publishing Internship, Waltham, MA (MyCWS ID 15546)
  • Physical Sciences Publishing Internship, Waltham, MA (MyCWS ID 15545)
  • Books Marketing Internship, Waltham, MA (MyCWS ID 15544)
  • Development/Fundraising Intern, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15567)
  • Impact America Media Production Fellowship, Birmingham, AL (MyCWS ID 15569)
  • Fall Intern, Office of the Governor, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15578)
  • CWS Fall Intern: Internships Team, Wellesley College (MyCWS ID 15595)
  • CWS Fall Graphic Design Intern, Wellesley College (MyCWS ID 15596)
  • CWS Fall Social Media Intern, Wellesley College (MyCWS ID 15597)
  • CWS Fall Communications/Marketing Intern, Wellesley College (MyCWS ID 15598)
  • CWS Fall Intern: On-Campus Recruiting Team, Wellesley College (MyCWS ID 15622)

Where Are They Now: Zoe Schladow ’11

Zoe Schladow

Please give a brief background on yourself and your career.
I work as a User Experience Designer in San Francisco. I started out in design and research by interning at the MIT Mobile Experience Lab while a student at Wellesley. I ended up working there for four years, and it was an amazing opportunity to learn from tremendously talented people. When I started at Wellesley, I was relatively unaware of the capabilities of modern technology, and as I discovered them, I knew that was where I wanted to be. It’s really exciting to be at the forefront of all the technological changes taking place in the world.

After staying in Boston for a year after graduation, I moved to New York City with a friend, hoping to figure things out and find a job when I arrived. Six months in, I received I job offer from Samsung in San Francisco. I grew up in Northern California and was happy to move back. I’ve been in the Bay Area for the last two years working mostly in design for wearables and connected home products.

How has your career changed since you originally envisioned it at Wellesley? What other careers did you consider as a student?
I had no idea what I wanted to do when I went to Wellesley. I applied to Wellesley for Biology, because it seemed noble to want to be a doctor. When I arrived, there was some sort of department fair and the first table was for Architecture. I always loved art and art history, and I thought architecture might blend those interests with the other things I liked. At Wellesley, Architecture is a multi-disciplinary degree, and so while I never actually wanted to be an architect, studying Architecture allowed me to take classes in art, art history, geology, math, computer science, and a wealth of other classes at MIT too. I’m really grateful for that.

Part of me still wonders if I should have pursued something else. I love writing and being around art, and on the days when I don’t like my current job, I think of how nice being a curator or editor might be. Or I’ll listen to the radio, hear an interesting story about foreign policy and regret that I don’t work at the State Department. In other words, that feeling of not knowing what you want to do with your life never ends, or at least not in your twenties.

How has Wellesley contributed to your career?
I’m not shy, and I didn’t lack confidence growing up, but I would not have had the tenacity to pursue a career in tech if I didn’t go to Wellesley. Strangely enough, there were almost no classes in design and technology when I went there (compared to HCI lab now), but I had internships, and was in an environment that made me feel like I could learn anything.

Even now in my career I can feel isolated; I am often the only woman in meetings, and I rarely see women in leadership positions. Wellesley makes me persevere where once I may have given up.

What is a typical work day or work week like for you?
I don’t have a typical work day, which is something I really like about being a designer. I spend about half the day at my desk working on making models, coming up with ideas, developing scenarios, doing research, etc, and the other half of the day I spend in and out of meetings, which can be presentations, reviews, or just discussions and working with others. I travel a lot for presentations and user testing. I’m always making things to explain what I’m thinking, but those things can be sketches, animations, storyboards, diagrams, or anything really.

What piece of advice would you offer students looking to get into your area of interest and expertise?
The skills I use now are things I learnt through my time at Wellesley, but not in any class in particular. Design is about problem solving, but a large part of my work is identifying and framing which problems to solve. To do this, you need to be able to think analytically, quickly understand a scenario and break it down, present thoughts coherently – these are skills that you pick up everywhere, not in any particular subject matter. I speak with a lot of graduating seniors and recent grads who fear they don’t have the right major or experience to go into UX design or something similar, but most of the time those students are really impressive and just don’t know it yet. There is definitely a lot to learn, and decades of literature and past experience to study, but at twenty-two, people expect you still have a lot to learn. You shouldn’t doubt yourself; if you go in with confidence, other people will have confidence in you.

It’s also really important to intern, because you learn from the people you work with, you make valuable connections, and you essentially get to test drive jobs.

What do you wish you had known as a student?
As a student I told myself to not feel too pressured, to not feel like I should be doing more, to not worry about the future, but I was secretly terrified I was wrong and that I would be making decisions that would ruin the rest of my life. I was not. I wish as a student I had known to enjoy classes more.

If you could come back and take one class at Wellesley what would it be?
Something in Physics, Philosophy, or English, probably?

Most of the time (unless you’re devotedly pre-med or something), your grades or even your major don’t matter. I wasted time thinking my GPA could be .1 higher, or that perhaps I should have a second major. I took some classes at Wellesley that I felt pressured to take, and I avoided some classes that I thought might be too difficult. You shouldn’t. Aside from some architectural history seminars and a few art classes, my favorite class at Wellesley was studying Dante’s Divine Comedy, which was taught at the time by Dr. Rachel Jacoff. I can’t say whether it has impacted my career, but it certainly made my life more beautiful.

What’s happening with the CWS — week of 4/6

this week @ cws

Below are this week’s upcoming events and deadlines at the CWS. These listings and more can be found in MyCWS. Make sure you subscribe so that you receive the updates directly to your inbox!

Monday, April 6-

  • Fulbright U.S. Student Program Info Session | 4:30-5:30PM | GRH 442 (CWS library) - The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Life After Wellesley | 5:30-8:30PM | SCI Center - CWS invites you to attend three dynamic sessions in preparation for your life after Wellesley!  Learn how to embrace personal finance, project a professional image, and find a new home after graduation.  The Center will provide fruit, dessert and coffee as refreshments. RSVP on MyCWS.

Tuesday, April 7 -

  • Job Search Workshop |12:30-1:30PM | GRH 428 - Thinking about post-graduation plans? Not sure where to begin? Join us for pizza and conversation about job search strategies. RSVP on MyCWS.

Wednesday, April 8 -

  • Alternative Breaks Site Leader – Office Hours for Application Questions | 12:00-2:00PM | 4th Floor Lulu Chow Wang Campus Center - Interested in applying to lead an intensive weeklong service trip with Wellesley’s Alternative Breaks program? Stop by our table on the 4th floor of Lulu to learn more about this great opportunity to get involved! Application deadline Friday, April 10th at 12PM.

Thursday, April 9 -

  • Alternative Breaks Site Leader – Office Hours for Application Questions | 10:00-12:00PM | GRH 442 - Interested in applying to lead an intensive weeklong service trip with Wellesley’s Alternative Breaks program? Stop by GRH 442 (CWS library) to learn more about this great opportunity to get involved! Application deadline Friday, April 10th at 12PM.
  • Ernst & Young Info Session and Workshop on Resumes/Cover Letters | 5:30-7:00PM | PNE 139 - During this workshop, EY professionals will provide an overview of their company and its culture, as well as give information on the recruiting timeline for full-time jobs within the consulting field. In addition, EY professionals will also share tips on how to write Consulting Resumes and Cover Letters. There will also be an opportunity for students to network with EY professionals after the workshop. Targeting juniors interested in full-time recruiting with EY, but open to all years as well. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Immigration Attorney Visit: Visa Options Beyond Student Status | 5:30-7:00PM | Library Lecture Room - Are you interested in working in the U.S. after you graduate?  Immigration Attorneys, Madeline Choi Cronin and Jennifer McNeil from Iandoli & Desai, P.C. will be here to give us an overview of some common visa options for international students. Come and join us and ask questions!

Friday, April 3-

  • How to be an Ideal Candidate: Advice on Professionalism from Employers | 12:30-1:30PM | GRH 428 - Interested in what employers look for in an ideal candidate? Then come to this workshop where we share feedback from Bit9, Clean Energy, Liberty Mutual, Hasbro, Commongood Careers, Constant Contact and Citizens Bank. This workshop will discuss interview tips, how to interact with employers and how employers use networking and information about you online to make decisions regarding your candidacy. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Exploring the Theater and Film Industry Panel | 5:00-6:00PM | PNE 212 - Come and hear Wellesley Alums in the theater and film industry talk about how they broke into the business! RSVP on MyCWS.

featured jobs of the week

All jobs and internships can be viewed via MyCWS; use MyCWS Job ID numbers to search.

  • Ophthalmic Assistant, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 14900)
  • Outreach and Partnership Internship, Communications and Marketing Internship, Women’s and Gender Policy Research Internship, or Women’s Leadership Institute Internship, Nationwide (MyCWS ID 15408)
  • Summer Teaching Internship,  Tuzla and Doboj, Bosnia and Herzegovina (MyCWS ID 15467)
  • Social Media Internship, Needham, MA (MyCWS ID 15489)
  • Graphic Designer, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15536)
  • Fashion Data Curator, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 14543)
  • Brand Ambassador, Various locations (MyCWS ID 15558)
  • Rates and Budgets Intern, El Segundo, CA (MyCWS ID 15468)
  • Business Development Intern, Malibu, CA (MyCWS ID 15474)
  • Energy Summer Intern, Greenwich, CT (MyCWS ID 15441)
  • Consulting Summer Intern, Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15426)

What’s happening with the CWS — week of 3/30

this week @ cws

Below are this week’s upcoming events and deadlines at the CWS. These listings and more can be found in MyCWS. Make sure you subscribe so that you receive the updates directly to your inbox!

Wednesday, April 1-

  • Alternative Breaks Site Leader Info Session | 12:30-1:30PM | PNE 239 - The success of each Alternative Break (AB) trip depends heavily upon the quality of its student leaders. In fact, strong Site Leaders ensure the success and effectiveness of the student-led program as a whole! It is the responsibility of site leaders to coordinate all on-site activities, facilitate participant training and education, and ultimately guide the group through a week of intense and rewarding service. Site Leaders will work with the Service Program Director and the AB Student Coordinators. No previous AB experience is required to become a Site Leader, although familiarity with community involvement and demonstrated leadership abilities are strongly preferred. If you are interested in learning more about the Site Leader position, and how you can help to build the Alternative Breaks movement as a student leader, we encourage you to attend an information session. Please register for this event through MyCWS.
  • Travel the World: Watson Fellowship Info Session | 7:00-8:00PM | SCI 396 - The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship offers college graduates of “unusual promise” a year of independent, purposeful exploration and travel — in international settings new to them — to enhance their capacity for resourcefulness, imagination, openness, and leadership and to foster their humane and effective participation in the world community. Alumnae have used the Watson to study the spinning of different fibers, overcoming social stigma in the classroom, the experiences of female taxi drivers, alternative energy sources, and glassblowing. Come learn more! RSVP on MyCWS.

Thursday, April 2 -

  • Fulbright U.S. Student Program Info Session |12:30-1:30PM | GRH 442 (CWS library) - The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Alternative Breaks Site Leader Info Session | 5:00-6:00PM | PNE 239 - The success of each Alternative Break (AB) trip depends heavily upon the quality of its student leaders. In fact, strong Site Leaders ensure the success and effectiveness of the student-led program as a whole! It is the responsibility of site leaders to coordinate all on-site activities, facilitate participant training and education, and ultimately guide the group through a week of intense and rewarding service. Site Leaders will work with the Service Program Director and the AB Student Coordinators. No previous AB experience is required to become a Site Leader, although familiarity with community involvement and demonstrated leadership abilities are strongly preferred. If you are interested in learning more about the Site Leader position, and how you can help to build the Alternative Breaks movement as a student leader, we encourage you to attend an information session. Please register for this event through MyCWS.

Friday, April 3-

  • Peace Corps Office Hours | 11:00AM-3:00PM | PNE 325 - Come meet with the Peace Corps Recruiter and ask any questions you have about the Peace Corps Experience or with the Peace Corps application process. No appointment is needed. Following the Office Hours, at 4pm, the Recruiter and a Wellesley Alumna will be giving an Info Session in PNE 139. Following the office hours, the Recruiter and a Wellesley Alumna will be giving an Info Session in PNE 139 at 4PM.
  • Peace Corps Info Session | 4:00-5:30PM | PNE 139 - Come learn more about Peace Corps from the Peace Corps Recruiter and from a Wellesley Alumna, Char Johnson Stoever, a 2012 alum who majored in French and Women’s Studies and currently serves as a TEFL Teacher trainer in Nicaragua from 2014-2016. Char and Rob are excited to meet current students interested in serving! RSVP on MyCWS.

featured jobs of the week

All jobs and internships can be viewed via MyCWS; use MyCWS Job ID numbers to search.

  • Summer 2015 Museum Internships, Salem, MA (MyCWS ID 15334)
  • Research and Publications Summer Intern, Washington, DC (MyCWS ID 15306)
  • Summer Research Assistant, New York, NY (MyCWS ID 15300)
  • Public Health Analyst (May 2015 Grads) (Health Care Quality and Outcomes Program), Waltham, MA (MyCWS ID 15337)
  • Financial Planning Summer Intern, Westborough, MA (MyCWS ID 15360)
  • Summer Office of the President – Handbook Coordinator Internship (Museum), Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15363)
  • Software Development Engineer/SDET Intern, Seattle, WA (MyCWS ID 14534)
  • Paralegal, New York City, NY (MyCWS ID 14656)
  • Research Assistant: Economics, Washington, DC (MyCWS ID 14929)
  • Rates and Budgets Intern, El Segundo, CA (MyCWS ID 15468)
  • Research Assistant, Cambridge, MA (MyCWS ID 15476)
  • Analyst – eCommerce Sales Support, Southborough, MA (MyCWS ID 15481)

What’s happening with the CWS — week of 3/16

this week @ cws

Below are this week’s upcoming events and deadlines at the CWS. These listings and more can be found in MyCWS. Make sure you subscribe so that you receive the updates directly to your inbox!

Monday, March 16 -

  • Quick Fix Grant Deadline | NOON | MyCWS - CWS “Quick Fix” Grants provide small amounts of funding to support short-term student projects that could not be anticipated far enough in advance to be covered by SOFC funding. Grants will be awarded throughout first and second semester to support student service projects. Up to $300 dollars for individuals and up to $600 for a group for an entire academic year. Apply via MyCWS Schedule ID #1285.
  • Ace Your Interview! Workshop | 12:30-1:30PM | GRH 428 - Want to become more familiar with interviewing? Join us to learn more about techniques and strategies that will help you ace the interview. Come to this session to become familiar with how you can prepare before, during and after the interview process. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Where to begin, when you don’t know where to begin Workshop | 4:00-5:00PM | GRH 428 - Do you feel stuck when figuring out what to do for the summer or after graduation?  Are you finding that many paths are intriguing to you?  Come to this session if you are seeking some practical and concrete steps to help identify a field that you would like to explore.  We will discuss how to understand yourself better and how to learn more about the working world. RSVP on MyCWS.

Tuesday, March 17 -

  • Where to begin, when you don’t know where to begin Workshop |12:30-1:30PM | GRH 428 - Do you feel stuck when figuring out what to do for the summer or after graduation?  Are you finding that many paths are intriguing to you?  Come to this session if you are seeking some practical and concrete steps to help identify a field that you would like to explore.  We will discuss how to understand yourself better and how to learn more about the working world. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Fulbright U.S. Student Program Info Session | 4:30-5:30PM | GRH 442 (CWS library) - The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding. RSVP on MyCWS.
  • Ace Your Interview! Workshop | 5:30-6:30PM | GRH 428 - Want to become more familiar with interviewing? Join us to learn more about techniques and strategies that will help you ace the interview. Come to this session to become familiar with how you can prepare before, during and after the interview process. RSVP on MyCWS.

 

 

featured jobs of the week

All jobs and internships can be viewed via MyCWS; use MyCWS Job ID numbers to search.

  • U.S. Senate Summer 2015 Internship, New York, NY (MyCWS ID 15235)
  • Trading Desk Operations, New York, NY (MyCWS ID 15201)
  • Spring Semester Marketing Intern, Wellesley, MA (MyCWS ID 14942)
  • Waldkindergarten Intern, Natick, MA (MyCWS ID 15168)
  • Business Development & Marketing Intern, Brookline, MA (MyCWS ID 15226)
  • Fashion Personal Assistant, Brookline, MA (MyCWS ID 15277)
  • Operations Intern, Cambridge and Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15203)
  • Development Intern, Cambridge and Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15205)
  • Communications Intern, Cambridge and Boston, MA (MyCWS ID 15206)
  • Marketing Coordinator Intern, Seattle, WA (MyCWS ID 15227)
  • Impact Organizer, Various Locations (MyCWS ID 14298)
  • Consulting Intern, Cambridge, MA (MyCWS ID 15282)
  • Consultant (Seniors only), Buenos Aires, Argentina (MyCWS ID 15253)
  • Leadership Development Program, Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, and New York, NY (MyCWS ID 15222)
  • Interactive Marketing Immersion Xperience (I-MIX), Mountain View, CA (MyCWS ID 15230)
  • NextGen Leaders Rotational Program (Seniors), New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA (MyCWS ID 15231)

Where Are They Now: Priscilla Weninger ’10

WeningerPlease give a brief background on yourself and your career.
I was born in Houston, TX to immigrant parents from Mexico and Peru. My mother fought for me to attend the top schools across town. If it hadn’t been for my amazing teachers, I would have never gone to Wellesley or received my Master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin by the time I was 23. My education privilege opened up amazing opportunities like studying abroad in Brazil and Italy, and working in D.C.

At UT Austin I studied social and economic policy, but focused on increasing educational attainment rates for low income communities of color. I joined Teach for America in 2012 and taught ninth grade English in a high-poverty community in Miami, Florida. It was an amazing experience that challenged me and pushed me to truly understand the systemic barriers that low-income children face in their pursuit for college. Within systems that work against students, teachers and leaders become incredibly critical to their success.

I recently moved back to Texas and committed myself to working within the human capital space in education, searching for truly transformative teachers and leaders for our kids. I work as a Talent Partner for IDEA Public Schools, a major charter school network that has sent 100% of its students to college for the past 8 years. My work revolves around coaching principals through the hiring process and recruiting top talent to our teacher and administrator positions. I also partner up with several campuses to improve organizational health and teacher retention. I love what I do!

How has your career changed since you originally envisioned it at Wellesley? What other careers did you consider as a student?
It actually took until the end of my sophomore fall semester to declare my major in Political Science. I had planned to major in Architecture my first year and took several studio art, art history, and math courses to fulfill those requirements. The summer after my first year at Wellesley I participated in a summer architecture program called “Career Discovery” at Harvard Graduate School of Design. While I really enjoyed that experience, I quickly realized that I didn’t have the level of passion that a career in architecture would require (given that it is a very long and strenuous career). One project I was given that summer was to build a school. I realized that I didn’t really care about the physical building as much as I did about the people who would be inside the building. I majored in Political Science on a whim–I knew that I liked the department and wanted to learn more about how public policies shaped our society.

How has Wellesley contributed to your career?
In high school I was the student who kept quiet and didn’t raise my hand when I had a question out of shame and fear. Wellesley changed that; it made me fearless and always willing to raise my hand, speak up, and go against the grain. I truly believe Wellesley’s culture of high expectations pushed me to become resilient when things have gotten tough in my career. Wellesley made me into a problem solver and critical thinker, and ultimately, a leader. My involvement with Mezcla and Society Zeta Alpha during my time at Wellesley helped me build key leadership and relationship-building skills that have only strengthened my roles as policy analyst, classroom teacher and talent strategist.

What is a typical work day or work week like for you?
There is absolutely no typical day or work week for me and I love that! For example, today I hosted a teacher recruitment banquet for over 45 participants. Most weeks involve phone screening teacher candidates, observing and evaluating sample teach lessons for final interviews, coaching my principals on difficult conversations with current teachers, collaborating with school leaders as far as talent placement and strategy, and organizing recruitment efforts. I move around a lot throughout the day, and since I also support schools in San Antonio, I am often on the road.

What piece of advice would you offer students looking to get into your area of interest and expertise?
Within public service I am a big believer of “doing your time” and working your way up. Start at the grassroots level–whether that is working as a community canvasser, organizer, teacher, tutor, or Peace Corps/Americorps member. There will always be time in the future to take the high-level position. Those positions are often disconnected from the community you are looking to serve. Grassroots experience is such a critical perspective to have in order to be successful in a higher-level role within public service.

What do you wish you had known as a student?
I wish I had advocated for myself more in class. When I got that first failing grade on a test my first year, I just shoved the test away in my backpack and felt inadequate. I decided economics was probably just not my thing. It took some time for me to realize that I could do well at Wellesley, as long as I advocated myself and sought out those resources. I wish I had gone straight to my professor’s office hours that day and asked him for help. That way I wouldn’t have waited 2 more years to take another Econ class. The second time around I had an amazing experience because I was able to truly hold myself and my professors accountable for my learning.

If you could come back and take one class at Wellesley what would it be?
I would have taken a religion class! Always wanted to, and wasn’t able to fit it in my schedule.