Blog Archives

When it snows…

20140205_134925I am sure you are tuned into the news about statue of the near-naked sleepwalker on the Munger Green. Sunday’s Superbowl XLVIII was a blowout and the half time show resulted in its own controversy about the fact that the Red Hot Chili Peppers really did not play live, but were accompanied by recordings of instruments. I loved a few of the commercials and suggested that they should have run them more during the second half because that would have been more fun than the game itself!

Now it is time to concentrate on NCAA basketball. I had good luck with calling the Superbowl outcome and I am wondering whether that luck will continue with NCAA bracket. I am looking to win $1 billion by getting every winner in the bracket right. And no, that won’t make me retire because I love what I do!

My introduction to the first major snow storm was in early 1979. I remember venturing out in the snow and trying to take the subway to Manhattan. I was bored in the apartment and wanted to get to school and do some work. That was how bored I was! But, the normal 10 minute walk from the apartment to the subway turned into a disaster, because, in 10 minutes I barely went to the end of my street because nothing had been cleaned. What a different world it has become now!

 

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Next wave of projects

I actually wanted to write a post on a regional CIO gathering organized by Gartner Associates on “Key Performance Indicators” (KPI) which was very interesting, but not much there to report. There are some really interesting ideas on how different CIOs measure the collective performances of their own organizations. Steve Laster, the CIO at Harvard Business School, gave some examples, some of the usual uptime stats for standard services such as email. However, a few other examples he provided were intriguing – time tracking by staff and “number of angry calls to the CIO per week”.

In the end, the question that was posed to the attendees by Laura Craft, who moderated the discussion, was “Can you think of IT metrics at the institutional level?” In other words, what are the KPIs for the institution itself and amongst them, which are IT related. This did not result in anything that I found useful, but there were some wild ideas. I told the attendees my experience at Pace, where KPIs were big. There the institutional KPIs were simply “# of admitted students by school, Yield, Financial Aid offered, Net Revenue”. Whereas IT plays an indirect support role in all these areas, none of these are affected by IT performance directly.

We in Library and Technology Services (LTS, the new IS) are continuing to work hard on many different projects and I would like to talk about some of these.

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Administrative Council Presentation

Last Tuesday (2/15/2011)  was yet another meeting-filled day and once again I took a resolution to block my meeting maker so I have at least one hour to catch up on things every day. It doesn’t appear that I will be able to accomplish this at least for a week or two. I was floating in and out of presentation by iStrategy, a Datawarehouse solution that uses modern dimensional data modeling techniques for reporting. I also attended a meeting with the faculty in the sciences around High Performance Computing (HPC) needs. Both were a lot of fun… Talking about HPC, I stopped writing for a few minutes to watch Watson compete in Jeopardy!

I was given an opportunity to talk at the Administrative Council at the College on Monday, Feb 14. I was happy to see a good attendance. Some of the attendees had already heard what I had to say more than once, so apologies to those for the repetition… I am going to touch on many of the important things that I talked about there, but if I miss anythign important, please email me and I will be happy to respond.

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